I need to try this on my grandmother’s sterling service that got willed to me. My Dad keeps asking me why I don’t set the table with it for holidays; I don’t want to tell him I’m afraid his mother’s silverware would give us all food poisoning…I have silver polish but I wince–and quickly find another chore to do–every time I think about having to stand there and individually polish an 80-piece sterling service set!
How about a necklace holder that has industrial flair? You could easily make one out of some copper pipe pieces and some copper end caps and fitting adapters. You’ll also need a piece of wood to use as a support for the whole thing. You can mix and match the pipes and fittings however you want so be creative and give it an interesting, geometric structure. Check out ehow for more details.
There are a number of ways that you can make a jewelry tree and they are perfect for hanging your bracelets or necklaces. For the simplest version, just grab a nice twig from the yard and stick it in a vase. Voila! You have necklace storage that costs nothing and literally takes about two minutes to make. You can also be a bit more crafty and create a beautiful tree that will hold necklaces, bracelets, and even rings if you want to take a bit more time. A jewelry tree looks great wherever you sit it and really does help to keep your jewelry organized.
An old Jenga game is the perfect place to begin organizing your jewelry. If you don’t have an old Jenga set, you can pick them up for less than $10 and they make a really neat looking display for your necklaces. Paint or decorate the wooden blocks if you want and then just put them together, holding them in place with strong glue. Hang it on the wall and you have a really modern looking necklace holder that is as fun to make as it is functional to use and it will keep those necklaces from tangling in the jewelry box.
This method works great on sterling, silver, gold, costume jewelry metals.. But do be careful if you’re got a lot crystals glued into a setting and limit soaking to no more than 90 seconds – or you might melt the glue. Also, don’t immerse natural pearls in this solution – it’s too caustic. It is however, fine for most gemstones and this homemade jewelry cleaner works wonders on cubic zirconia (CZ stones)! And in case you’re wondering ….it also works fab for cleaning silverware, silver frames or any silver home decor!

Layered Earring DIY ~ The layered look of these earrings is fabulous!  Can you believe that they are felt?  Simply trace and cut the desired shape on felt and attach to fish hooks.  How simple yet elegant! 2.  DIY Tassel Earrings ~ Tassels aren’t just for curtain tie backs or lamp shades.  I think they are perfect for earrings too!  Simply use your choice of chain whether it’s gold, silver or bronze and tie it off with matching wire.  If you desire a punch of pizzazz you can add some colored thread! 3.  DIY Patinaed Filigree Earrings ~ These patinaed filigree earrings are absolutely fabulous!  And of course, very stylish!  Learn how to patina earrings with a technique using craft acrylic paint, distressing and clear spray paint.
I used to make and sell a “purple jewelry cleaner” that was also amazing but only knew how to make it in 55 gallon drums! Was biodegradable and non-toxic! Anyway, the reason why these cleansers should never be used on Pearls, Opals and costume jewelry, is because they are considered soft stones, they have to be glued into their setting, rather than prong set. Most cleansers will destroy the glue, at least over time. Costume jewelry stones are also usually glued in rather than the labor intensive work of prong set, to keep cost down and make it more affordable. Costume jewelry is also made with “slag” metal or junk metal, definitely sub-standard and doesn’t usually hold up against cleansers either. They can turn ugly colors and sometimes, even soften the metals used in costume jewelry. I don’t claim to know everything about anything but I do know a lot about jewelry cleaners, having sold ours for 25 years all over the country.
This method works great on sterling, silver, gold, costume jewelry metals.. But do be careful if you’re got a lot crystals glued into a setting and limit soaking to no more than 90 seconds – or you might melt the glue. Also, don’t immerse natural pearls in this solution – it’s too caustic. It is however, fine for most gemstones and this homemade jewelry cleaner works wonders on cubic zirconia (CZ stones)! And in case you’re wondering ….it also works fab for cleaning silverware, silver frames or any silver home decor!
A wooden accordion rack is a great way to keep your jewelry organized and they are really cheap at the Dollar Store or Dollar Tree. You could also use plastic racks if that’s what you want. You can paint or decorate them however you want and then just hang them on the wall to hold necklaces and bracelets. Stack a few of them up the wall to have somewhere to keep all of your longer pieces organized. They make the perfect jewelry organizers and they’re really cheap, which is always a good thing. Plus, there’s little work involved to turn them into jewelry holders.
i work in precious metals so i have used rubbing alcohol, just put gold or silver in a jar, with the rubbing alcohol and wait overnight. there should be a drastic difference in shine and clarity. it does work for all types of jewelry and precious metals except for pearls and rhodium. definitely do not use this stuff on rhodium. it may cause an explosion, just maybe with rhodium.
I even cautiously tried the leftover solution on a costume jewellery pair of earrings (I DON’T recommend anyone else reading this to try this though as your jewellery could be very different quality to mine!) and it worked to remove the last bits of tarnish off the chain- already used baking soda on it before and most of it was shiny as new, but this last method completely removed everything else. My costume jewellery was made of very good metal and handiwork so the solution did not damage my jewellery. Thank you so much again for such invaluable tips and advice!

The first evidence you’re going to have that this homemade jewelry cleaner worked will be all the stuff floating around in your vinegar/tea tree oil liquid. The last time I put my jewelry in this mixture I didn’t think it was too dirty, and it didn’t exactly need cleaning. Within just a few minutes, though, there was so much stuff floating around in the water that I was appalled.


A necklace holder can be as simple as a wooden board with some knobs on it. Actually that’s a pretty good description of the project showcased on asmithofalltrades. As you can probably anticipate, you don’t need many things if you want to make something similar. So go find yourself a board, stain it or paint it, drill two holes in two of its corners so you can hang it and screw in a few knobs. You can mix and match them however you want.
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